Landsat NASASocial – Day 1

On February 10 and 11, I was once of a lucky group of about 80 participants in the NASASocial for the launch of the Landsat Data Continuity Mission (Landsat 8). Over 2000 people applied to participate in this event, I was lucky enough to get chosen as a participant. This experience was even more awesome because I was able to bring my family to view the launch, which most of the time isn’t allowed at a NASASocial.

Landsat satellites provide the longest continuous global record of the Earth’s surface – ever. The first Landsat satellite launched from Vandenberg in 1972 and now what will become the eighth satellite in the Landsat series is scheduled to also launch from Vandenberg. This satellite, the Landsat Data Continuity Mission (LDCM), continues Landsat’s critical role in monitoring, understanding and managing our resources of food, water and forests.

A collaboration between NASA and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the Landsat program provides data that shows the impact of human society on the planet – a crucial measure as our population surpasses seven billion people. Landsat data has, over time, led to the improvement of human and biodiversity health, energy and water management, urban planning, disaster recovery and agriculture monitoring, all resulting in incalculable benefits to the U.S. and world economy.

LDCM will join the aging Landsat 5 and Landsat 7 satellites in orbit to produce stunning images of Earth’s surface along with a wealth of scientific data. If you’ve ever used Google Earth, Google Maps, or another mapping service on the Internet, you’ve probably seen pictures taken by a Landsat satellite. Watch the copyright at the bottom of the page, when it says United States Geological Survey, you are probably looking at a Landsat image.

The first day of the event began with our arrival at the South Gate of Vandenberg Air Force Base on a chilly Friday morning, we checked in and were whisked by bus to the NASA building on base.

For about 2 hours, we got presentations on the Landsat Program, the construction of the satellite, how Landsat data is used, the collaboration between NASA and the 30th Space Wing at Vandenberg AFB, and several other topics. The entire program, including the Q&A, was broadcast live on NASA TV. You can view the program below:

At about 01:18:40, you’ll hear me ask a question of Col. Nina Armagno, the Commander of the 30th Space Wing.

After the morning program was over, we got to tour the NASA control center at VAFB and hear from PAO George Diller, who was the launch commentator for this mission and many a shuttle launch.

Then, we headed to lunch, cooked by the non-commissioned officers association at VAFB. Even though I grew up in California, I had never heard of Santa Maria barbeque. This was some of the best BBQ I have ever tasted. My $10 bought me a full plate of Tri-Tip, beans, and salad. I asked for the recipe, which they wouldn’t give me, but the did allow me to try an decipher the recipe by having seconds… and maybe thirds….

We then headed out to the Vandenberg Heritage Center, located at Space Launch Complex (SLC) 10. We were walked around the old Thor missile & launch system by Jay Prichard, who is one of the best tour guides I’ve ever had anywhere, period. He knew his stuff and presented it in an engaging and funny way that conveyed good information and made us all laugh.

34-Seriously, Jay is the best Tour Guide Ever!

Our next stop, albeit brief, was the overview of SLC 6. This launch complex, now used for the Delta heavy rocket, was slated to be used for west coast launches of the Space Shuttle before the Challenger Disaster occurred.

52-SLC 6

The building on the right shelters the rocket. It separates down the middle when it’s time for launch, each half moving 300 feet away from the vehicle. For a sense of scale, look at the flag painted o the building. Each of the stripes is 13 feet wide.

Our final stop of the day was the coolest, in my opinion. We were lucky enough to go to SLC3 to see the Atlas V rocket with Landsat on it. That’s right, we got to visit the launch pad of the rocket we were going to watch launch, a mere 18 hours before it was set to launch.

59-That's a Rocket Behind Me!

We spent about an hour on the launch pad, and were able to get within about 500 feet of the rocket. I can’t describe how cool it was to be on the launch pad of the rocket we were going to watch launch the next morning. It was beyond amazing!

While there, we also got to meet NASA Administrator Charlie Bolden and Kennedy Space Center Director Bob Cabana, both former astronauts. Both were as nice as can be! Here’s a pic of them holding my favorite space chicken, Camilla Corona SDO.

57-Camilla, Bolden, & Cabana

That night some of us gathered for dinner in beautiful, downtown Lompoc. This was an especially fun event because we were joined by some folks who didn’t get in to the official NASASocial event, but came up to see the launch anyway!

63-The NASASocial Dinner Group

In my next post, I’ll detail the launch experience.

For all the pictures from Day 1, visit my Flickr set Landsat LDCM NASASocial Day 1

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One response to “Landsat NASASocial – Day 1

  1. Pingback: Landsat NASASocial – Day 2 – The Launch | John Rambles On...

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