Tag Archives: Independence Day

Independence Day 2014

In honor of Independence Day 2014, I’m making my annual vexillological display to honor the birth of the United States.

Independence Day 2014

The flags displayed are as follows:

Top Row (Left to Right):

The Grand Union Flag

This flag, also known as the Continental Colors, was first hoisted on the Alfred, in Philadelphia on December 2, 1775, by Lt. John Paul Jones. This flag was also used by American Continental forces as both naval ensign and garrison flag through 1776 and early 1777. It served as a national flag until the adoption of the first version of the Stars and Stripes on June 14, 1777. This flag has been in my collection since the 1980s.

The Betsy Ross Flag

On June 14, 1777, the Continental Congress adopted a resolution stating, “Resolved, that the flag of the United States be thirteen stripes, alternate red and white; that the union be thirteen stars, white in a blue field representing a new constellation.” The oft repeated story that Betsy Ross, a Philadelphia seamstress, designed and made the first flag of this pattern have never been verified, nor have the claims to that honor for Francis Hopkinson, a well known political leader from New Jersey. This flag (and several variants of it, including the Grand Union, below) served as the flag of the United States from June 14, 1777 to May 1, 1795. This flag has been in my collection since the 1980s.

The Star Spangled Banner

This is the flag that was flying over Ft. McHenry when Francis Scott Key penned his famous poem, now our national anthem. When the first two states after the original thirteen were added to our nation, the flag was modified to add both a star and a stripe for each state, bringing the total to fifteen stars and fifteen stripes. When five additional states were added in 1818, it was decided to reduce the number of striped back to thirteen to honor the original states, and add a star for each new state. The Star Spangled Banner served as the flag of the United States from May 1, 1795 to July 3, 1818. I purchased this flag at Ft. McHenry in Baltimore in the late 1990s.

The Fremont Flag 

This flag was carried by Gen. John C. Fremont on his wide-spread expeditions in the western United States in the 1840s. As the United States flag was not normally carried by units of the Army during this period, the Fremont Flag was especially prepared for his expeditions. This flag has been in my collection since the 1980s.

The Flag of the United States

Containing fifty stars and thirteen stripes, the current flag of the United States has been in use since July 4, 1960, a period of 53 years, making it the longest serving flag of our nation. Containing fifty stars and thirteen stripes. The forty eight star flag, in use from July 4, 1912 to July 3, 1959, holds second place. This flag was flown over the United States Capitol on February 27,1997.

Bottom Row (Left to Right):

The Rhode Island Flag

The basis for Rhode Island’s present state flag, this flag, which bears the famous motto “Hope” was carried by Rhode Island Troops at the Revolutionary War battles of Brandywine, Trenton, and Yorktown. This flag has been in my collection since the 1980s. This flag has been in my collection since the 1980s.

The Continental Flag

This flag dates from the Revolutionary War and was carried at the Battle of Bunker Hill. It is a form of the Red Ensign, which was flown on ships of the period. Replacing the Union Jack in the canton of the flag is a green New England Pine tree. The Bunker Hill Flag is a variant on this same theme. This flag has been in my collection since the 1980s.

The Gadsen Flag

This flag was used as the Captain’s personal flag on ships of the Continental Navy. It is based on a common symbol of the cause of the American revolution, the rattlesnake, and includes the words, “Don’t Tread on Me.” The Gadsen flag was different from the other flags of this theme in that the rattlesnake is featured coiled, rather than crawling. The Continental Navy Jack, also known as the First Navy Jack, was used by the Continental Navy and is currently used as the jack on all United States war ships. This flag has been in my collection since the 1980s.

Historical information gleaned from the book Flags of American History by David D. Crouthers, published in 1978 by Hammond Incorporated.

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Flags of American History – 2013

In honor of Independence Day 2013, I’m making my annual vexilogical display to honor the birth of the United States. The poll on this blog indicated that the preference was for the “Flags of American History” so I’ve rearranged the flags a bit to better display them in a visual sense.

Flags of American History 2013

The flags displayed are as follows:

Top Row:

The Gadsen Flag

This flag was used as the Captain’s personal flag on ships of the Continental Navy. It is based on a common symbol of the cause of the American revolution, the rattlesnake, and includes the words, “Don’t Tread on Me.” The Gadsen flag was different from the other flags of this theme in that the rattlesnake is featured coiled, rather than crawling. The Continental Navy Jack, also known as the First Navy Jack, was used by the Continental Navy and is currently used as the jack on all United States war ships. This flag has been in my collection since the 1980s.

Middle Row (Left to Right):

The Betsy Ross Flag

On June 14, 1777, the Continental Congress adopted a resolution stating, “Resolved, that the flag of the United States be thirteen stripes, alternate red and white; that the union be thirteen stars, white in a blue field representing a new constellation.” The oft repeated story that Betsy Ross, a Philadelphia seamstress, designed and made the first flag of this pattern have never been verified, nor have the claims to that honor for Francis Hopkinson, a well known political leader from New Jersey. This flag (and several variants of it, including the Grand Union, below) served as the flag of the United States from June 14, 1777 to May 1, 1795. This flag has been in my collection since the 1980s.

The Flag of the United States

Containing fifty stars and thirteen stripes, the current flag of the United States has been in use since July 4, 1960, a period of 53 years, making it the longest serving flag of our nation. Containing fifty stars and thirteen stripes. The forty eight star flag, in use from July 4, 1912 to July 3, 1959, holds second place. This flag was flown over the United States Capitol on July 1, 2009 in honor of my son’s first birthday.

The Star Spangled Banner

This is the flag that was flying over Ft. McHenry when Francis Scott Key penned his famous poem, now our national anthem. When the first two states after the original thirteen were added to our nation, the flag was modified to add both a star and a stripe for each state, bringing the total to fifteen stars and fifteen stripes. When five additional states were added in 1818, it was decided to reduce the number of striped back to thirteen to honor the original states, and add a star for each new state. The Star Spangled Banner served as the flag of the United States from May 1, 1795 to July 3, 1818. I purchased this flag at Ft. McHenry in Baltimore in the late 1990s.

Bottom Row (Left to Right):

The Continental Flag

This flag dates from the Revolutionary War and was carried at the Battle of Bunker Hill. It is a form of the Red Ensign, which was flown on ships of the period. Replacing the Union Jack in the canton of the flag is a green New England Pine tree. The Bunker Hill Flag is a variant on this same theme. This flag has been in my collection since the 1980s. This flag has been in my collection since the 1980s.

The Grand Union Flag

This flag, also known as the Continental Colors, was first hoisted on the Alfred, in Philadelphia on December 2, 1775, by Lt. John Paul Jones. This flag was also used by American Continental forces as both naval ensign and garrison flag through 1776 and early 1777. It served as a national flag until the adoption of the first version of the Stars and Stripes on June 14, 1777. This flag has been in my collection since the 1980s.

The Fremont Flag 

This flag was carried by Gen. John C. Fremont on his wide-spread expeditions in the western United States in the 1840s. As the United States flag was not normally carried by unites of the Army during this period, the Fremont Flag was especially prepared for his expeditions. This flag has been in my collection since the 1980s.

The Rhode Island Flag

The basis for Rhode Island’s present state flag, this flag, which bears the famous motto “Hope” was carried by Rhode Island Troops at the Revolutionary War battles of Brandywine, Trenton, and Yorktown. This flag has been in my collection since the 1980s. This flag has been in my collection since the 1980s.

Historical information gleaned from the book Flags of American History by David D. Crouthers, published in 1978 by Hammond Incorporated.

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Flags of American History

In honor of Independence Day, I’ve decided to do a vexilological display entitled Flags of American History. In truth, I left it to the internets to decided the theme of this year’s display. I was instructed by the 14 people who voted to go with Flags of American History, so here we go.

The flags displayed are as follows:

Top Row:

The Betsy Ross Flag

On June 14, 1777, the Continental Congress adopted a resolution stating, “Resolved, that the flag of the United States be thirteen stripes, alternate red and white; that the union be thirteen stars, white in a blue field representing a new constellation.” The oft repeated story that Betsy Ross, a Philadelphia seamstress, designed and made the first flag of this pattern have never been verified, nor have the claims to that honor for Francis Hopkinson, a well known political leader from New Jersey. This flag (and several variants of it, served as the flag of the United States from June 14, 1777 to May 1, 1795. This flag has been in my collection since the 1980s.

Middle Row (Left to Right):

The Rhode Island Flag

The basis for Rhode Island’s present state flag, this flag, which bears the famous motto “Hope” was carried by Rhode Island Troops at the Revolutionary War battles of Brandywine, Trenton, and Yorktown. This flag has been in my collection since the 1980s. This flag has been in my collection since the 1980s.

The Flag of the United States

Containing fifty stars and thirteen stripes, the current flag of the United States has been in use since July 4, 1960, a period of 52 years, making it the longest serving flag of our nation. Containing fifty stars and thirteen stripes. The forty eight star flag, in use from July 4, 1912 to July 3, 1959, holds second place. This flag was flown over the United States Capitol on February 22, 1997.

The Gadsen Flag

This flag was used as the Captain’s personal flag on ships of the Continental Navy. It is based on a common symbol of the cause of the American revolution, the rattlesnake, and includes the words, “Don’t Tread on Me.” The Gadsen flag was different from the other flags of this theme in that the rattlesnake is featured coiled, rather than crawling. The Continental Navy Jack, also known as the First Navy Jack, was used by the Continental Navy and is currently used as the jack on all United States war ships. This flag has been in my collection since the 1980s.

Bottom Row (Left to Right):

The Star Spangled Banner

This is the flag that was flying over Ft. McHenry, when Francis Scott Key penned his famous poem, now our national anthem. When the first two states after the original thirteen were added to our nation, the flag was modified to add both a star and a stripe for each state, bringing the total to fifteen stars and fifteen stripes. When five additional states were added in 1818, it was decided to reduce the number of striped back to thirteen to honor the original states, and add a star for each new state. The Star Spangled Banner served as the flag of the United States from May 1, 1795 to July 3, 1818. I purchased this flag at Ft. McHenry in Baltimore in the last 1990s.

The Continental Flag

This flag dates from the Revolutionary War and was carried at the Battle of Bunker Hill. It is a form of the Red Ensign, which was flown on ships of the period. Replacing the Union Jack in the canton of the flag is a green New England Pine tree. The Bunker Hill Flag is a variant on this same theme. This flag has been in my collection since the 1980s. This flag has been in my collection since the 1980s.

The Grand Union Flag

This flag, also known as the Continental Colors, was first hoisted on the Alfred, in Philadelphia on December 2, 1775, by Lt. John Paul Jones. This flag was also used by American Continental forces as both naval ensign and garrison flag through 1776 and early 1777. It served as a national flag until the adoption of the first version of the Stars and Stripes on June 14, 1777. This flag has been in my collection since the 1980s.

The Fremont Flag 

This flag was carried by Gen. John C. Fremont on his wide-spread expeditions in the western United States in the 1840s. As the United States flag was not normally carried by unites of the Army during this period, the Fremont Flag was especially prepared for his expeditions. This flag has been in my collection since the 1980s.

Historical information gleaned from the book Flags of American History by David D. Crouthers, published in 1977 by Hammond Incorporated.

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What Flags Should I Display on Independence Day?

As some of you know, I am a collector of flags. You may also know that Independence Day is my favorite holiday. As such, I’m putting the question out to the internets… What type of flags should I display on Independence Day 2012?

  • Flags of American History will be a display of the current and some former flags of our nation along with some historic flags from the Revolutionary War
  • Capitol Flags will be the US flags that I’ve had flown over the United States Capitol in commemoration of momentous occasions in my life and that of my family
  • State Flags will be a display of some of the state flags that I have (along with the US Flag, of course)

I’m opening this poll now and I’ll close it at 2000 PDT on July 3rd. Please let me know your thoughts!

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Declaration of Independence Quiz

As Independence Day is approaching, I wanted to post my Declaration of Independence quiz. This is a quiz about the document and its signers and does contain a trick question or two. Email or DM me with your answers. I will post answers here on Independence Day!

1. According to the Declaration of Independence, from where do just governments derive their power?

a. Divine Providence

b. Consent of the Governed

c. The will of God

d. None of the above

2. According to the Declaration of Independence, what does prudence dictate?

a. that the rights of the people my not be usurped

b. that taxation without representation violates the rights of man

c. that Governments long established should not be changed for light and transient causes.

3. Which of these is not among the facts submitted in the Declaration of Independence to a candid world?

a. He has dissolved representative houses repeatedly, for opposing with manly firmness his invasions on the rights of the people.

b. He has obstructed the Administration of Justice, by refusing his assent to laws for establishing judiciary powers.

c. He has kept among us, in times of peace, standing armies without the consent of our legislatures.

d. He has, without consultation with representative houses, imposed taxes upon the people of these states.

4. According to the Declaration of Independence, what have the people of the United States done “in every stage of these oppressions?”

a. Petitioned for redress in most humble terms

b. Obeyed oppressive orders for the good of the people.

c. Respectfully submitted protests of his actions

5. The authors of the Declaration of Independence state that they have tried to gain the support of the “British Brethren” by doing all of the following, except:

a. Warning them from time to time of attempts by their legislature to extend an unwarrantable jurisdiction over us.

b. Reminding them of the circumstances of our emigration and settlement here

c. Stating facts about the crimes committed against them.

d. Appealing to their native justice and magnanimity.

6. In whose name and authority do the authors of the Declaration of Independence declare independence on behalf of?

a. “The good people of these colonies”

b. “The people of the United States”

c. “all those living in these thirteen united colonies.”

d. “The thirteen colonies of the United States”

7. The signers pledge which of the following to support the Declaration of Independence.

a. “Our will, our strength, and our courage.”

b. “Our treasury, our will, and our lives.”

c. “Our lives, our fortunes, and our sacred honor.”

8. Josiah Bartlett was the name of which of the following?

a. President of the United States in a TV Series.

d. The secretary of the first Continental Congress.

c. A signer of the Declaration of Independence

d. A & C

9. Among the following figures, which did not sign the Declaration of Independence?

a. Thomas Jefferson

b. Benjamin Franklin

c. John Adams

d. George Washington

10. Which of the following rights are guaranteed by the Declaration of Independence?

a. Freedom of Speech, Freedom of Assembly, the Right to Bear Arms

b. Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Happiness

c. Representative Government, Trial by Jury, and Bail.

d. None of the above.

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Alexander Hamilton

Last year, a friend of mine sent me a link to a video from the White House Poetry Jam  held in May of 2009. The video was of a performer named Lin–Michael Miranda performing “The Alexander Hamilton Mixtape.” The way Mr. Miranda tells Mr. Hamilton’s story is unlike anything I’ve ever head before. It’s a reminder of what people can accomplish, no matter their background or obstacles they face.

As Independence Day approaches, this video is worth a watch.

http://www.whitehouse.gov/photos-and-video/video/lin-manuel-miranda-performs-white-house-poetry-jam-8-8?v=accessibility

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